Religious Roulette

A visual interpretation of the commonality between religion and casinos, loosely derived from Karl Marx’s Critique of Hegel’s Philosophy of Right.

The base of the concept comes from Karl Marx’s Critique of Hegel’s Philosophy of Right,
“Religious distress is at the same time the expression of real distress and the protest against real distress. Religion is the sigh of the oppressed creature, the heart of a heartless world, just as it is the spirit of a spiritless situation. It is the opium of the people. The abolition of religion as the illusory happiness of the people is required for their real happiness. The demand to give up the illusion about its condition is the demand to give up a condition that needs illusions.”
 
Casinos are very similar to religion if one really looks carefully into it. Casinos are flocked by people who dream and aspire to get rich quickly, having this illusory belief that they can win if they just keep trying. Just as some folks get addicted to religion, always seeking an answer from it, so do some people who frequent casinos, often ending up betting their life savings in an attempt to win.
 
The roulette wheel itself was chosen because it is one of the ultimate games of luck and chance in the casino. Unlike card games such as poker or blackjack, roulette gives you no control over the outcome other than allowing you to choose a number. Similarly, you may choose your religion, but their beliefs and methods are seldom within your control.
 
The religious roulette depicts thirty-six religions incorporated in the place of the numbers, with the lead position (the green box) being occupied with the 37th symbol. This is the emblem of the Illuminati, a supposedly secret society of the rich elitists. In all, there are thirty-eight symbols.
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